Brazlian jet maker Embraer employs about 600 people in Melbourne, Fla., and is expanding. (Greg Allen/NPR)

Brazlian jet maker Embraer employs about 600 people in Melbourne, Fla., and is expanding. (Greg Allen/NPR)

With Shuttles Gone, Private Ventures Give Florida’s Space Coast A Lift

It has been five years since NASA retired the space shuttle, ending a federal program that employed some 10,000 people around Cape Canaveral, Fla.

The loss of those jobs was a blow to Florida’s Space Coast, an area closely identified with NASA and the nation’s space program. But the region’s economy is bouncing back and attracting companies that are in a new space race.

In fact, it might be more accurate now to call it the Aerospace Coast. In 2009, the Brazilian jet maker Embraer gave this region a boost when it broke ground on its plant in Melbourne, Fla.

Plant director Phil Krull is proud of the spacious, remarkably quiet production area. A few air drills and some occasional clangs sound. “This is about as noisy as you’re going to hear out here,” he says as he walks through the plant. At least a dozen small jets are in various stages of assembly. Krull says all the parts are shipped from Embraer’s home facility in Brazil.

Embraer employs about 600 people here and is expanding. Its main product is the Phenom 300, the best-selling business jet in the world. “It’s a workhorse,” Krull says. “The skins are thicker than our competitors’. But it’s just a great design.” And it comes with a price tag of about $10 million each.

Embraer was lured to Melbourne by generous incentives and a talented workforce. The company hired engineers and technicians who used to work on the defunct shuttle program. When the program ended, several thousand people found themselves out of work, just as the recession began.

“Having both at the same time, I don’t think you could probably pick a more severe circumstance,” says Lynda Weatherman, who heads the region’s economic development commission. “We had an unemployment rate that was near 12 percent and that’s a lot.”

Since then, the Space Coast has attracted companies that don’t just launch from here, but also do research, development and manufacturing.

Lockheed Martin and Boeing started that trend when they won contracts to build the next generation of NASA spacecraft. Lockheed is working on the Orion deep space mission. Boeing is building a commercial crew capsule to service the International Space Station.

Weatherman says those contracts sent an important message to people and companies on the Space Coast: “There was a second act for space.”

Billionaire Jeff Bezos gave the region a lift last fall when he announced he was bringing his Blue Origin company to the Space Coast, along with a $200 million plant and more than 300 jobs. It will be part of a complex for commercial space companies just outside the gates of Kennedy Space Center.


Continue reading

El Paso, TX. If HB2 is upheld, the only clinic in El Paso will have to close. (Blick auf El Paso vom Scenic Drive aus,  Lechhansl, 2006, Wikimedia Commons.)

El Paso, TX. If HB2 is upheld, the only clinic in El Paso will have to close. (Blick auf El Paso vom Scenic Drive aus, Lechhansl, 2006, Wikimedia Commons.)

Texas Women Head to New Mexico for Abortion Services

This summer, the U.S. Supreme Court is expected to weigh in on Whole Woman’s Health vs. Hellerstedt. The case hinges on whether or not Texas law is putting undue burdens on patients by forcing abortion providers to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals and by making abortion clinics meet the higher standards of ambulatory surgical centers.

The law has meant that some Texas women are choosing to leave the state for abortions.

Last year, in Dallas, an international student from Honduras had a problem. We’ll call her “Sharon” because she wasn’t comfortable using her real name to tell her story publicly.

Sharon found out she was pregnant about four months along and was worried. Coming from Honduras, where abortion is illegal, she wasn’t sure if she could even have a procedure in the U.S. She did some research and went to a Christian health center where they confirmed her pregnancy. They prayed for her and asked her to not abort, but she had already decided that having a baby was not the right choice for her.

Texas House Bill 2 was passed in 2013. It changed the rules for women seeking legal abortion. Supporters of the bill say it made abortion safer, opponents say it reduces women’s access to abortions. After its passage, the number of abortion providers in the state shrunk from 36 to less than 20, forcing some women to leave the state for abortions.


Continue reading

A diagram of a vintage telescope owned by Donald Judd that will be on hand at Saturday night's star party for the public to use. (Judd Foundation)

A diagram of a vintage telescope owned by Donald Judd that will be on hand at Saturday night's star party for the public to use. (Judd Foundation)

Friday Interview: Judd Foundation Hosts Star Party in Marfa

The organization that maintains and preserves artist Donald Judd’s living and working spaces is hosting a community stargazing party in Marfa, TX this weekend.

On Saturday, May 28th, the Judd Foundation will open to the public “La Mansana de Chinati/The Block,” Judd’s former home in Marfa. The Block will be open for viewing from 7:30 to 9 PM, and a star party will follow at 9:30.

Caitlin Murray, Archivist & Programs Manager for the Judd Foundation, joined us to talk about the program and Judd’s interest in astronomy. Allen Gilchrist, a local amateur astronomer, will be on hand with others pointing out objects of interest in the night sky and helping visitors use the telescopes that will be available. He joined us as well to talk about his background in astronomy and what visitors might get to see Saturday night.

More information about Saturday’s Star Party and open viewing of La Mansana de Chinati/The Block is available here.

West Texas Talk is broadcast at 6:30 pm each weekday.
photograph by Aimee Roberson, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
The Rio Grande silvery minnow was once the most abundant fish in the river, but had disappeared from Texas by the 1960s. Now, biologists are trying to reintroduce the minnow in the Big Bend.

photograph by Aimee Roberson, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service The Rio Grande silvery minnow was once the most abundant fish in the river, but had disappeared from Texas by the 1960s. Now, biologists are trying to reintroduce the minnow in the Big Bend.

Return of the Rio Grande Silvery Minnow

Fish – not what leaps to mind when you think of the native wildlife of the Southwest. But the Rio Grande historically has been home to dozens of fish species – including some not found in any other river system. … Continue reading

Nature Notes is broadcast Tuesdays and Thursdays at 8:35 am and 4:45 pm.
Alvin Lucier & Charles Curtis (Lorne Matalon)

Alvin Lucier & Charles Curtis (Lorne Matalon)

Thursday Interview: Alvin Lucier & Charles Curtis

Memorial Day weekend (May 26–29) Marfa Live Arts and Fieldwork: Marfa present Marfa Sounding with composer Alvin Lucier and cellist Charles Curtis.

From the Marfa Live Arts website; “This series of free sound installations, talks, and performances taking place in outdoor sites and interiors throughout Marfa opens up new ways of experiencing the spaces and environs of West Texas through sound. We spoke with Alvin Lucier and Charles Curtis about their longtime collaboration, how they will leverage the unique physical attributes of the land, wind and beauty of West Texas as they explore, jointly and solo, the art of sound. You can see a schedule here.

Marfa will welcome summer by welcoming sound artists who’ll be leveraging the beauty , the geography, the boundless sky-scapes, the wind, the echoes of this unique part of the world, to share sound installations indoors and out…to..say the project’s directors, QUOTE open up new ways of experiencing the spaces and environs of West Texas through sound.”

West Texas Talk is broadcast at 6:30 pm each weekday.
Customs and Border Protection said this trailer was discovered to be carrying a large load of marijuana when it drove through a Border Patrol checkpoint south of Alpine. (Customs and Border Protection)

Customs and Border Protection said this trailer was discovered to be carrying a large load of marijuana when it drove through a Border Patrol checkpoint south of Alpine. (Customs and Border Protection)

Border Patrol Makes Large Pot Bust South of Alpine

Border Patrol agents made a 1,146 lb. marijuana bust at the Border Patrol’s checkpoint south of Alpine on Highway 118 on Monday.

Customs and Border Protection (CBP) said the bust happened around 5 PM Monday. According to CBP, a man identified only as a U.S. citizen drove into the checkpoint pulling a trailer with an ATV and a motorcycle on board.

CBP said a drug-detecting dog alerted to the vehicle, and that after agents pulled the vehicle aside for a secondary inspection, they discovered 1,075 bundles of marijuana hidden in a false compartment in the trailer.

The vehicle, the man and the drugs were handed over to the DEA.

The Border Patrol’s Big Bend Sector Spokesperson Bill Brooks said it was an unusually large bust for that particular checkpoint, describing it as “not your day-to-day bust.” But, Brooks said busts of that size happen often enough that it’s not exactly rare.

Border Patrol agents found 1,057 bundles of marijuana hidden in a trailer on Monday. (Customs and Border Protection)

Border Patrol agents found 1,057 bundles of marijuana hidden in a trailer on Monday. (Customs and Border Protection)

There’s no word yet on where the drugs might have come from. Border Patrol estimates the worth of the drugs at $2 million.

Authorities remove the body of Errol Zane Trinkley from a remote canyon in South Brewster County on Sunday, May 22, 2016. (Brewster County Sheriff's Office)

Authorities remove the body of Errol Zane Trinkley from a remote canyon in South Brewster County on Sunday, May 22, 2016. (Brewster County Sheriff's Office)

Authorities Investigating Death in South Brewster County

The Brewster County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the death of 31-year-old Errol Zane Trinkley of San Benito, Texas, whose body was found in a rugged part of South Brewster County on Sunday.

In a Facebook post, the sheriff’s office said Trinkley was found in a “rough, shallow canyon” west of State Highway 118. Authorities believe Trinkley left his vehicle, walked to the edge of a 50-foot cliff and somehow fell, landing on the rocks below.

The death is being investigated as an accident. The cause of death is believed to be a fatal head injury, though the sheriff’s office said an autopsy has not been ordered, pending further investigation.

 

A view of Santa Elena Canyon from July 28, 2012. (Robert Hensley/flickr)

A view of Santa Elena Canyon from July 28, 2012. (Robert Hensley/flickr)

Texas Man Falls to his Death in Big Bend National Park

Big Bend National Park in Far West Texas is known for its remote and rugged terrain, with a geology found nowhere else in the state. It attracts hikers and bird-watchers to its mountain trails, as well as rafters and canoeists to the Rio Grande. The ruggedness of the park was on display this week, when a man fell to his death.

The Santa Elena Canyon Trail is just under two miles, round trip. On Wednesday afternoon, a man died there. David Elkowitz is the public information officer: “Sadly, on May 18th about 2 pm, a 20-year-old male name Brett Leondike from LaVernia, Texas, suffered a fatal fall.”

The trail concludes in one of the most popular places in Big Bend National Park, at Santa Elena Canyon, which rises 1,500 feet above the Rio Grande.

“The fall was approximately 100 feet,” said Elkowitz. “I don’t recall a fatality by falling for many many years, if ever. It’s an accident, I assume, although the cause is under investigation.”

This comes less than a week another fatality, when a 37-year old male from San Angelo, Texas, died on a hike with his wife and parents in the southwest portion of the park.

Levi Lane was jailed when he was unable to pay previous traffic fines. (Lorne Matalon)

Levi Lane was jailed when he was unable to pay previous traffic fines. (Lorne Matalon)

Modern Day ‘Debtor Prisons’ Challenged In Federal Court In Texas

EL PASO, Texas — This border city has a policy on its books that allows the city to jail people who cannot pay their traffic fines. Now a lawsuit filed in federal court is challenging the policy, saying it violates citizens’ constitutional right of equal protection under the law guaranteed by the Fourteenth Amendment of the United States constitution.

The story that led to the filing of this lawsuit was began at 2 AM on April 23 2014. Levi Lane was driving home after his shift at a dog food factory.

“I get intercepted by the police. They pull up behind my car,” Lane recounted. He said that police searched his car, and that he granted that permission to search the car after two officers told Lane they wanted to check the vehicle for narcotics.

“They didn’t find anything. They weren’t going to find anything,” Lane said.

But the story changed immediately when the officers ran Lane’s license. “They found out that I had, like, 13 traffic warrants,” he recounted. That translated to approximately $3,400 in unpaid fines.

“From there on out, story over, he said. “My registration was expired and I didn’t have any insurance, and I couldn’t update my registration because of the lack of insurance prior to that.”

Lane had decided decided to roll the dice – and drive to his overnight shift – because buses in El Paso don’t operate round the clock. He lived across town and he needed the work.

“Kind of puts you in a situation that’s hard to get out of when the money starts to stack,” he said. Lane was brought into court later that morning. He pleaded guilty to his previous offenses. He could’ve gone home then and there if he could pay a portion of the outstanding fines. He couldn’t.

And here’s the issue: both federal and state law say you can’t jail someone for non-payment unless you first have a hearing first to see if that person is really unable to pay. If they can’t, the Supreme Court, Texas law, and the Justice Department all say alternatives like a payment plan, reduced fines or community service must be considered. Lane never had that hearing.


Continue reading

Tom Michael, founding General Manager, at the launch of Marfa Public Radio, 2006.

Tom Michael, founding General Manager, at the launch of Marfa Public Radio, 2006.

Marfa Public Radio Founder Accepts New GM Role in Idaho

Marfa Public Radio General Manager Tom Michael is leaving West Texas, more than a decade after founding the station in 2005.

Michael has accepted a position as General Manager of Boise State Public Radio in Idaho.

Since starting the region’s only source for NPR news from scratch, Michael helped build KRTS into a public media network of four stations that serves a wide range of West Texas – from Sierra Blanca to Marathon, Big Bend National Park to the Permian Basin.

Michael sat down to talk about his July 2016 departure and to reflect back on 11 years of building a listener-supported media organization in a region that previously had few other stations on the FM dial.


Continue reading

San Angelo Man Dies at Big Bend National Park

This story has been updated to include the identity of the victim, released by Big Bend National Park Wednesday, May 18.

37-year-old John Wayne Seale of San Angelo, Texas died last week in Big Bend National Park (BBNP) after being found unconscious.

National Park Service rangers and a Border Patrol agent responded to a call for assistance last Thursday (May 12) at the Dorgan House trailhead near the Castolon Historic District in the park’s southwestern region.

They found Seale unconscious and tried CPR multiple times but were ultimately unable to revive him. In a statement, the park said his wife and parents were there at the time, and that the incident occurred near one of the park’s main roads.

The cause of death is still unknown. 

Big Bend Superintendent Cindy Ott-Jones said the park is “truly saddened” by what she called the “tragic” death, and offered her condolences to Seale’s family and friends.

A shoreline near Woods Hole, MA, with the historic Nobska Lighthouse in the distance. (Travis Bubenik/KRTS)

A shoreline near Woods Hole, MA, with the historic Nobska Lighthouse in the distance. (Travis Bubenik/KRTS)

Last Thoughts on the WCAI-KRTS “Radio Hometown” Host Exchange

For the last few weeks, Marfa Public Radio and WCAI in Woods Hole, Massachusetts held a first-of-its-kind host exchange experiment called Radio Hometown: Two Stations, Two Hosts, One Community of Listeners.

With the exchange wrapped up, our guest host Steve Junker talked with KRTS host Travis Bubenik about the takeaways from the experiment.

You can listen back to some of the conversations Travis had with Steve and the rest of the WCAI team here.

Pipe for the planned Trans-Pecos Pipeline sits at a staging yard outside Fort Stockton, TX. (Travis Bubenik/KRTS)

Pipe for the planned Trans-Pecos Pipeline sits at a staging yard outside Fort Stockton, TX. (Travis Bubenik/KRTS)

Feds Grant Permission for Trans-Pecos Pipeline to Cross Rio Grande

On Thursday (May 5), the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issued a permit allowing the Trans-Pecos Pipeline to cross underneath the Rio Grande. The permit was issued after a lengthy environmental review.

This gives the pipeline operators, Energy Transfer, a key approval to ultimately export natural gas from the United States into Mexico through the 143-mile proposed pipeline. Whether or not the federal agency would issue the permit was closely watched by both company officials and by pipeline protestors.

FERC said it received about 625 public comments about its review, including some from elected officials in Far West Texas.

Here is a key section in the permit: FERC Appendix C.

Marine construction worker Matthew Bumpus prepares to dive underwater to repair a mooring chain near Woods Hole, MA. (Travis Bubenik/KRTS)

Marine construction worker Matthew Bumpus prepares to dive underwater to repair a mooring chain near Woods Hole, MA. (Travis Bubenik/KRTS)

Host Exchange Dispatch: Working Hard Underwater

The countdown to the end of this host exchange started this week, and at the same time, I’ve started counting up all the things I haven’t gotten around to doing. Wondering about all the people and stories I’ve yet to meet and hear, all the weird little glimpses of life you only get from a place with time.

So I’m kinda bummed this thing’s coming to an end so quick, but I’m happy to report that I did finally get around to that quintessentially Cape Cod-ian feat of actually getting out on the water.

I’m pretty sure the spirit of Far West Texas resides somewhere on the underside of an Ocotillo far off even the least-maintained of unmaintained 4×4 roads.

Similarly, I think maybe the soul of New England lives somewhere under the growling engine of an old, worn-in-but-not-worn-out boat as it eases back into the harbor – a cold, slow-drizzling rain not doing much more than making sure your fingers stay numb and the deck stays slippery.

I went to that place this week. A local marine repair and underwater construction worker named Matthew Bumpus invited me out with his step dad “Kit” Olmsted.


Continue reading

Though artists flocked to Provincetown, Massachusetts throughout the early 20th century, Bill Evaul moved there when the town's artist colony really started to grow into its own in the 1970's. (Travis Bubenik/KRTS)

Though artists flocked to Provincetown, Massachusetts throughout the early 20th century, Bill Evaul moved there when the town's artist colony really started to grow into its own in the 1970's. (Travis Bubenik/KRTS)

Familiar Themes in an Artist Colony’s Evolution

Our morning host Travis Bubenik has been traveling around Cape Cod, Massachusetts for the past couple of weeks, exploring the commonalities between Far West Texas and small communities on the northeastern coast.

It’s part of our host exchange experiment, Radio Hometown: Two Hosts, Two Stations, One Community of Listeners.

This week, Travis discovered that a place called Provincetown on the northern edge of the Cape – one of the first parts of the “New World” the pilgrims laid eyes on – experienced a reinvention and revitalization similar to what’s happened in Marfa in recent years.

Except, in Provincetown, it happened decades ago. Local artist Bill Evaul was there when it started, and shared some lessons learned from living decades in an artist community and tourist hotspot.

Veggies In Cattle Country: Texas Hospital Formally Promotes Plant-Based Diet

This dish, an African stew, consists of vegetables and legumes, the essence of a plant-based diet. A leading hospital has become the first in historically beef-loving Texas to formally promote plant-based and vegetarian food for patients and visitors. (Lorne Matalon)

This dish, an African stew, consists of vegetables and legumes, the essence of a plant-based diet. A leading hospital has become the first in historically beef-loving Texas to formally promote plant-based and vegetarian food for patients and visitors. (Lorne Matalon)

 

MIDLAND, Texas—A leading hospital in Texas is making a name for itself by taking on the ranching industry, an iconic fixture in the history of the Lone Star State. The hospital is now promoting a plant-based diet rich in vegetables and whole grains for patients and visitors.

First, here’s a definition. “Plant-based” diet means ingestion of fruits, vegetables, legumes like alfalfa, peas, beans and peanuts, and no meat.

Nurturing cattle, sending them to the feed lot and then onto the slaughterhouse, is a part of the culture here, burnished into a big part of what makes Texas, Texas. Now, Midland Memorial Hospital, a major medical player in the heart of cattle country, has become the first in the state to buck that culture.


Continue reading

One of the many beaches on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, soon to be much more crowded as tourists flock to the area for the summer. (Travis Bubenik/KRTS)

One of the many beaches on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, soon to be much more crowded as tourists flock to the area for the summer. (Travis Bubenik/KRTS)

Host Exchange Dispatch: Can Cape Cod Teach Marfa How To Be a Tourist Economy?

Marfa Public Radio and WCAI in Woods Hole, Massachusetts have embarked on a first-of-its-kind public radio experiment. WCAI All Things Considered host Steve Junker is swapping places with KRTS Morning Edition host Travis Bubenik for three weeks. 

We’re exploring what our similarly-isolated communities have in common – even thousands of miles away from each other – in an effort to broaden the conversation around some close-to-home issues. Read more about the experiment here.

Driving into the small coastal village of Woods Hole at midnight, it’s hard to even realize the Atlantic Ocean is so close by.

Thick patches of tall trees line the windy highway in and scatter throughout the town. With the temperatures still in the 40’s at night, it feels more like rural Colorado than a place known for fishing, sandy beaches and expensive summer getaways.

Sunday morning I set out to find that great anthesis to the desert: clear blue waves crashing against the shore.

Even for someone who spent a lot of time on the Texas coast, this kind of coast is exotic. A cold breeze blows in off the water. (I barely even knew you could be on a beach and be cold at the same time!)

Plenty of tourists stream into Marfa and the Big Bend region in the busy seasons of course, but it’s apparently nothing like what happens here in the summer. The cape’s been drawing thousands of tourists – many of them wealthy and powerful – for decades. Martha’s Vineyard, a presidential getaway, is just across the water from Woods Hole.

I’m here just before the tourist season explodes, and the streets seem calm and quaint. But locals tell me – often with a groan – that in just a few weeks, long lines of traffic on the main road in and out will be a common headache. The small local coffee shop will soon see lines out the door, around the clock.


Continue reading

MurrowAward_2016

Your Public Radio Station Just Won 8 Regional Murrow Awards

For the second year in the row, Marfa Public Radio (along with West Texas Public Radio) is the most awarded small-market station in the nation during the regional Murrow Awards for excellence in journalism in 2015.

According to the Radio Television Digital News Association, “In the small market radio category, Marfa Public Radio in Marfa, Texas, took home eight Murrows, including Overall Excellence, News Series and News Documentary.” Here are the winners:

  • NEWS DOCUMENTARYMcDonald Observatory in 2015 (Asa Merritt, Dallas Baxter, Drew Stuart, Ian Lewis, Anna Rose MacArthur, Katherine Rae Mondo)
  • OVERALL EXCELLENCE:  Marfa Public Radio in 2015 (Tom Michael, Travis Bubenik, Lorne Matalon, Mia Warren, Anna Rose MacArthur)

Thanks to all our donating members who make this work possible.


Continue reading

The Ysleta Port of Entry at the El Paso-Juarez border. (Wbaron via Wikimedia Commons CC BY-SA 3.0)

Texas Border Protection Officer Accused Of Smuggling Immigrants Into US

A U.S. customs officer on trial this week in El Paso is accused of smuggling people into the country illegally, including immigrants who had been deported.

On Tuesday, witnesses said Lawrence Madrid, a supervisory officer with U.S. Customs and Border Protection, helped them enter the U.S. through an official port of entry in El Paso without the required documentation in 2010 and 2011.

One witness said Madrid crossed him back after he’d been convicted of car burglary and sent back to his native Mexico. The immigrants said they paid bribes of up to $2,500 to get across.

Madrid, his wife and one other person were indicted in August by a federal grand jury for conspiracy, immigrant smuggling and bribery of a public official.

Witnesses told the defense they hoped they could stay in U.S. after cooperating with the investigation, but said the government didn’t give them any guarantees. Madrid and his wife could face ten years or more in prison if convicted.

This story was reported by Mónica Ortiz Uribe, in collaboration with Fronteras, The Changing America Desk, a consortium of NPR member stations in the Southwest.

This story was reported by Mónica Ortiz Uribe, in collaboration with Fronteras, The Changing America Desk, a consortium of NPR member stations in the Southwest.

Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
YM

Wed. May 25 Interview: Live From the KRTS Youth Media Listening Party

Sally Beauvais, lead instructor of the KRTS Youth Media program, hosts this special edition of West Texas Talk, which features the projects completed by this semester’s youth media students.

West Texas Talk is broadcast live at 6:30 pm each weekday.
Comments Off on Live From the KRTS Youth Media Listening Party
Photo Courtesy ; Philly.com

Mon. May 23 Interview: Bob Dylan at 75

Bob Dylan turns 75 years old on the 24th of May, and to celebrate, Marfa Live Arts is inviting people from the Big Bend and beyond to attend Bob Dylan’s 75th Birthday Jam.

In this edition of West Texas Talk, Tom Michael sits down with Jennie Lyn Hamilton, of Marfa Live Arts, to talk about the living legend and spin a few tunes from the The Bootleg Series Vol. 12: The Cutting Edge 1965–1966. Songs include Love Minus Zero, Subterranean Homesick Blues, Highway 61 Revisited, Visions of Johanna, and several outtakes.

West Texas Talk is broadcast live at 6:30 pm each weekday.
Comments Off on Bob Dylan at 75
Caballos novaculite – which geologists believe was formed some 400 million years ago in a deep-sea basin – caps the ridges above Post Park, south of Marathon in Brewster County.

Traces of the Supercontinent: Landscapes of the Marathon Basin

Africa collided with what’s now the eastern United States, while South and North America fused near the equator. Three hundred million years ago, the continents had joined to form a single land mass – the supercontinent known as Pangaea. The … Continue reading

Nature Notes is broadcast Tuesdays and Thursdays at 8:35 am and 4:45 pm.
Comments Off on Traces of the Supercontinent: Landscapes of the Marathon Basin
Photo Courtesy ; Nashvillescene.com

Tue. May 17 Interview: Remembering Guy Clark

West Texas Talk is normally an interview program. This episode is slightly different, but necessary for remembering a Texas music legend. Guy Clark, guitarist, singer, songwriter, and Texas native has passed away at the age of 74.

Throughout Clark’s long career, spanning 14 albums and near-constant touring, he never forgot about the the state which he grew up in, taking inspirations from Monahans, where he was born, to Rockport, while collaborating with other legendary Texas musicians such as Townes Van Zandt and Jerry Jeff Walker.

This West Texas Talk includes a segment from a radio-documentary produced by KUT in Austin titled West Texas 1941: The Story of Guy Clark., hosted by public radio journalist David Brown.

West Texas Talk is broadcast live at 6:30 pm each weekday.
Comments Off on Remembering Guy Clark