Super Tuesday In Texas: What You Need To Know

By Marfa Public Radio

Texas voters today are heading to polls to cast ballots in several local, statewide and legislative races, including the presidential primary. Here’s a breakdown of what you need to know ahead of voting in the state’s 2020 primaries.

Outside a polling place in Alpine, TX on Election Day, 2016. (Travis Lux/KRTS)

Am I Registered To Vote?

You can check your voter registration status on the Texas Secretary of State’s website. Once there, you’ll find three different ways to confirm your voter registration. You can either provide your Texas driver’s license number and date of birth or provide your first and last names and the county you reside in. Additionally, you can also enter your date of birth and your Voter Unique Identifier to check your registration.


Can I still Register To Vote?

The deadline to register to vote was Feb. 3. So if you’re not registered to vote, you won’t be able to cast a ballot in the primaries.


I’m Registered. Can I Cast My Ballot By Mail?

The deadline for voters to apply for a ballot by mail was Feb. 21. Voters are able to cast their ballot by mail for a handful of reasons. Eligible voters are 65 years or older, disabled, will be out of their county throughout all of Early Voting and Election Day, or are confined in jail, but able to vote.


Where Can I Cast My Ballot?

Texans must vote in the county where they’re registered. You can find a list of West Texas polling locations on the map below. Additionally, you can find your polling location on the Texas Secretary of State’s website (you’ll need to first enter in your voter information).

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Here are the Early Voting sites for Ector and Midland counties.


Do I Need To Take ID?

Once you get to your polling location, you’ll need one of seven types of photo ID. You can present your Texas driver’s license, a Texas election identification certificate, a Texas personal identification card, a state license to carry a handgun, a U.S. military ID card with a photo, a U.S. citizenship certificate with a photo, or a U.S. passport (book or card).

Photo IDs can be up to date, or expired up to four years. Voters older than 70 can bring any valid form of photo ID that has been expired for any length of time.

Voters who have trouble getting a valid ID—or don’t have one—are still able to vote, but will need to sign a form swearing there was a “reasonable impediment” to getting one. However, these voters will need to bring an alternative form of ID. That includes voter registration certificate, a certified birth certificate, an original or copy of a government document with your name and address, an original current utility bill, an original bank statement, an original government check or paycheck.

About Carlos Morales

Carlos Morales is Marfa Public Radio's News Director, Border and Immigration Reporter, and Morning Edition Host.
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