Caló Previous Episodes

Caló: I think it’s because they don’t like your ramfla, ese

Órale, ranfla is the featured word of this episode. It’s an endearing word for one’s car. Comparable words in English are jalopy and hot rod. It comes from the English word, Rambler, an old car brand that’s no longer around.

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Caló: You le pones a los wildlife, and I le pongo a los cats

Órale, the term ponerle is the feature of today’s episode. In Spanish it means to add to or put on top of. In Caló it means bet on or prefer something in particular. It can also be used to say leave, as in “I’m going to ponerle” or “you better ponerle” The general idea behind ponerle is that of gambling, where you put your chips down before the roulette wheel spins or the dealer spreads another round, so when somebody le pone, they’re either favoring something or gathering their chips and heading for the door.

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Caló: Then eat cuitcha

The word of the day is cuitcha, an alternative spelling is cuatcha. It means excrement and comes from the Comanche or Numunuu word for poop, cuita. Its etymology can also be traced to the Aztec or Nahuatl word cuitlatl. It’s been in the Caló lexicon for centuries.

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Caló: Chaquetera!

Órale, the word for this episode of Caló is ‘chaquetear.’ It’s a verb that means to switch sides or betray your side. It comes from the English word, jacket, which has been adopted in many Spanish-speaking countries as ‘chaqueta.’ The literal meaning is to don the opposition’s color or style of jacket while abandoning that of the side or party you at first belonged to.

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Caló: You left your chivas

Órale, chiva is the word for this episode of Caló. In Spanish, it means “goat.” In Caló, it means “stuff,” as in “my stuff” or “their stuff.” It invokes a general aesthetic of a goatherd going through life herding goats, which straggle, get lost and sometimes even get poached by predators.

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