Caló Previous Episodes

Caló: El New Year’s Eve

Órale, the Caló word for this episode is ‘morra.’ It means girlfriend. It implies mutual attraction, but it’s gender specific. The masculine counterpart, morro, means alternatively dandy and old man. A term that is often used inaccurately in place of morra is ruca, which means wildflower woman, but it implies a one-way opportunistic relationship. In other words, a vato pursues a ruca but not to be a morra. 

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Caló: Watchas, El Cinco De Mayo

Órale, today’s episode is about the word ‘watcha.’ It means look at, get my point, or watch out. It comes from the English word, watch. It could very well be the most used word in Caló today, as it’s become somewhat of a catchall, watchas.

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Caló: Gacho

Órale, today the focus is going to be on the word ‘gacho.’ It means undesireable, mean, bad. It’s rooted in the French word for left-handed, ‘gauche,’ which back in time represented the wrong way. That meaning evoled in Caló to the point the term is now very value laden, as in, “Que gacho George. He wouldn’t co-sign my car loan. Now I have to buy something gacho.”

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Caló: Escamado

Órale, in today’s episode we’re going to use the word ‘escamar.’ It means to spook or frighten. It’s not modern Spanish, but it’s rooted in the old Castilian word for spirit, ‘espanto.’ There’s a variation more common to the northern part of the Rio Grande that’s closer to the root, spantar.’ Sometimes the two words are used together to distinguish between fear of the flesh from fear of the soul, as in he’s escamado his horse will get spantado and rear up.

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Caló: Torcido And In The Pinta

Órale, today’s episode is about the words ‘torcido’ and ‘pinta.’ In modern Spanish, torcido means twisted and pinta means painted. In Caló, torcido means, accused, indicted, found out, or outed, and pinta means prison or jail. Torcido is always an adjective, as in ‘tainted.” And pinta is always a noun, a place certain.

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