Past Interviews

Thursday, Mar 14, 2019:
Writer Kerry Howley On Larry Nassar, MMA, And American Surveillance

On this episode, Rachel Monroe speaks to Lannan writer-in-residence Kerry Howley. Howley is a contributor to New York Magazine and teaches at the University of Iowa’s Nonfiction Writing Program.

They discuss Howley’s writing on Larry Nassar (the USA Gymnastics national team doctor who abused countless patients, mixed martial arts, and American surveillance – the subject of Howley’s forthcoming book.

Howley will read at the Crowley Theater at 6 pm on Sunday, March 17th.

Thursday, Mar 7, 2019:
Short-story Writer Deborah Eisenberg

On this episode, Rachel Monroe talks to lauded short-story writer Deborah Eisenberg. Her latest book is Your Duck is My Duck, published in 2018.  

They discuss how Eisenberg started her writing career, her gravitation to the short story form, and the sense of calamity that’s pervasive throughout her writing.

Eisenberg will read at 6 pm at the Crowley Theater on Sunday, March 10th.

Thursday, Feb 28, 2019:
Stephanos Papadopoulos

On this episode, Ian Lewis speaks to Stephanos Papadopoulos, a poet and current fellow at the Lannan Writing Residency in Marfa.

Papadopoulos was born in North Carolina and raised in Paris and Athens. He currently lives in Bend, Oregon. Papadopoulos is the author of three books of poetry, Hotel-Dieu, Lost Days, and The Black Sea. He is also the editor and co-translator of Derek Walcott’s Selected Poems, translated into Greek.

Papadopoulos will read at the Crowley Theater on Sunday, March 3rd at 6 pm.

Thursday, Feb 21, 2019:
Considering The Past and Present With Sherwin Bitsui

Sherwin Bitsui — a Diné poet from the Navajo Reservation in White Cone, Arizona — is the author of three poetry collections, Shapeshift, Flood Song, and Dissolve. He lives in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and teaches at the Institute of American Indian Arts.

On this episode, the writer talks about his life, the role of poetry, and his influences.

Bitsui is a Lannan resident in Marfa and will read at the Crowley Theater on Sunday, February 24 at 6 pm.

Thursday, Feb 14, 2019:
Joe Nick Patoski On The Hippies, Pickers, Slackers, And Geeks Who Transformed The Capital Of Texas

On this episode, Marfa Public Radio DJ and writer Joe Nick Patoski talks about his latest book, Austin to ATX. It’s a biography of the city that delves into the hippies, pickers, slackers, and geeks who transformed Austin’s culture.

Patoski will read at 6 pm on Friday, February 15th at the Crowley Theater and at 3 pm on Saturday, February 16th at Front Street Books.

He’ll also host a live “Texas Music Hour of Power” at the radio station on Saturday from 6 to 9 pm. All are invited to come by the station!

Thursday, Feb 7, 2019:
The Challenges For Teachers And Schools In Rural Texas

The 2019 Texas legislative session began last month with the states’ leaders saying they would prioritize the school finance system, maybe even giving teachers an across the board raise.

School districts, especially in rural Texas, are paying attention.

According to the Texas Education Agency, Texas has more schools in rural areas than any other state…but, when it comes to public policy, big cities can dominate the conversation.

So in this series, reporters talked to teachers, administrators and the advocates who support them. We’ll hear about the struggles and successes of rural schools and teachers, and what they say they need from lawmakers in Austin.

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Thursday, Jan 31, 2019:
Author Bill Wright On Border Legend Maggie Smith

On this episode, author Bill Wright talks about his latest book, The Whole Damn Cheese. 

The book sheds light on Maggie Smith, a Big Bend woman who built her life along the Rio Grande running trading posts, selling candelilla wax, and fostering relationships with people from both sides of the border.

Thursday, Jan 24, 2019:
How Did So Many Migrant Children End Up In Tornillo, And Why Did It Close?

As of January 11, there are no longer migrant children being held at a U.S. Health and Human Services facility in Tornillo, Texas.

The shelter sprang up last summer and housed mostly minors who crossed the border without parents or adult family members. It received scrutiny as it opened during family separation as a result of the now-reversed “zero-tolerance” policy. The tent city quickly became a flashpoint for critics of the Trump Administration.

During Tornillo’s operation, about 6,200 unaccompanied minors were housed at the site over time. While the majority of them have since been released to sponsors, somewhere between 300 to 700 children have been placed in more permanent shelters across the country.

On this episode, Diana Nguyen speaks to Marfa Public Radio reporters Carlos Morales, Sally Beauvais, and  El Paso-based journalist Bob Moore about the Tornillo shelter’s opening, closure, and the policies that shaped the significant uptick of children in government custody.

Thursday, Jan 17, 2019:
Poet Monica Youn Discusses Her Book, “Blackacre”

On this episode, Ryan Paradiso speaks to Lannan resident Monica Youn about her book, Blackacre, and about Youn’s transition from a lawyer, to a writer.

Youn currently teaches poetry at Princeton University and is the author of two other books, Barter and Ignatz. 

She will read at the Crowley Theater on Sunday, January 20 at 6 pm.

Thursday, Jan 10, 2019:
Jenny George

On this Edition of West Texas Talk, a conversation with current Lannan Writer-in Residence, Jenny George.

George is the author of The Dream of Reason, published by Copper Canyon Press, and also a winner of the “Discovery”/Boston Review Poetry Prize, as well as a recipient of fellowships from The Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, the MacDowell Colony, and Yaddo.

She currently lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico, where she works in social justice philanthropy.